World Cup: Origins to Brazil’s dance celebrations that angered Roy Keane

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Brazil lit up the World Cup on Monday night when they dismantled South Korea 4-1 in their World Cup round of 16 tie, but it wasn’t just their football that became the talk of many. .

First-half goals from Vinicius Jr, Neymar, Richarlison and Lucas Paquetá did damage as Tite’s side advanced to the quarter-finals to set up a quarter-final encounter with Croatia.

Aside from the silky skills, the joyous celebrations of each Brazilian goal delighted those inside the 974 Stadium in Qatar.

Brazil's dance for every goal in their World Cup win over South Korea has been a talking point.

Brazil’s dance for every goal in their World Cup win over South Korea has been a talking point.

The South Americans showed their dancing feet during their resounding 4-1 victory in the round of 16.

The South Americans showed their dancing feet during their resounding 4-1 victory in the round of 16.

With every goal that hit the back of the South Korean goal, another wacky dance move ensued.

Vinicius Jr’s goal was inspired by a song that is becoming popular on TikTok in Brazil called Birimbola Pagoda. The dance to the Os Quebradeiras song had already been performed by the in-form winger during the group stage, but to no avail as his goal against Switzerland was disallowed for offside.

The celebration of the second goal was an authentic choreography by those of Tite. After Neymar scored a penalty, Vinicius Jr, Paquetá and Raphinha lined up to dance.

the quartet danced Oz Crias da Sele̤̣o Рa song by Oz Crias and DJ LC da Roca.

And it has since been revealed that the song was initially not even going to be released before the World Cup. Unfortunately, West Ham midfielder Paquetá told Oz Crias that he intended to dance to that song after hearing it, which was evidenced by Neymar’s goal.

The celebration of Vinicius Jr's goal (left) in Pagodao do Birimbola was joined by his teammates

Vinicius Jr’s goal celebration (left) a Birimbola Pagoda joined his companions

Brazil's second, scored by Neymar (right), saw the players dance to the song Oz Crias da Selecao

Brazil’s second, scored by Neymar (right), saw the players dance to the song Oz Crias da Seleção

Richarlison’s celebration has been seen before and is derived from a funk song called dove dance (Dance of the Dove) by an artist called MC Faisca.

Fast forward to 2018 and the song got a second mainstream rise when Richarlison recorded a video of himself listening to the song and imitating a pigeon in a hotel room.

Then at Everton, it became his trademark as he started scoring goals for the Toffees. His success internationally has made fans in Brazil familiar with that celebration, including Chief Tite, who also did his own imitation of the celebration on Monday along with his number 9.

And Paquetá himself entered the scoreboard in the 36th minute, defending his dance after the game.

‘In dance we symbolize the joy of scoring the goal. We do not do it to disrespect him, we do not go in front of an opponent.

Richarlison (centre right) danced like a dove with Brazil coach Tite after scoring his third goal.

Richarlison (centre right) danced like a dove with Brazil coach Tite after scoring his third goal.

Lucas Paquetá (right) defended his team's celebrations, saying that

Lucas Paquetá (right) defended his team’s celebrations, saying they “symbolize the joy of scoring.”

His comments were in response to Roy Keane, who criticized the dance team during his analysis for ITV.

‘Fantastic shot from Vinicius, great start to the game. But I’ve never seen so much dancing,’ she raged.

‘I can’t believe what I’m seeing, I can’t believe what I’m seeing, it’s like watching Strictly [Come Dancing].

‘I do not like this. People say it’s their culture. But I think that is really disrespecting the opposition.

‘There are four goals, and they are doing it every time.

‘I don’t care so much about the first dance, it’s the next one, and the manager gets involved.

I’m not happy with that. I don’t think it’s good at all.

A furious Roy Keane compared it all to watching the popular BBC dance show 'Strictly Come Dancing'

A furious Roy Keane compared it all to watching the popular BBC dance show ‘Strictly Come Dancing’

Liverpool great Graeme Souness was also irritated by Brazil's antics, fully backing Keane's furious verdict and calling the dance a

Graeme Souness was equally irritated by Brazil’s antics and backed Keane’s furious verdict.

Graeme Souness backed Keane’s verdict and was equally furious at the constant dancing after goals.

“It’s only a matter of time before someone runs through one of these Brazilians,” said the Scotsman.

Keane has since come under fire in Brazil, with the former Manchester United and Republic of Ireland captain coming under fire for his own football career and pundit skills.

Leading television channel in Brazil sports tnt wrote on Twitter: ‘HELLO ROY KEANE! DON’T YOU LIKE DANCES? BITE YOUR BACK! THIS RIGHT HERE IS BRAZIL!

See if you can do something like that! Even Tite will dance here! Like it or not.’

Brazilian television channel TNT Sports responded to Keane by saying on Twitter:

Brazilian television channel TNT Sports responded to Keane by saying on Twitter: “This here is Brazil!”

Another Brazilian announcer, balloonshe responded to Keane’s criticism by looking back on some of his lowest moments as a player.

His report, which describes him as the ‘executioner’ after his goal against Palmeiras in the 1999 Intercontinental Cup final, takes a closer look at the most controversial incidents of his career, including his bitter consequences with the head of the Republic. of Ireland, Mick McCarthy, in the 2002 World Cup and the infamous gruesome tackle that ended Alf-Inge Haaland’s career.

Luis Castro, the head coach of Brazilian Serie A club Botafogo, called Keane “inelegant” and said he simply does not understand the country’s culture.

Castro said on sportv, via balloons: ‘Roy Keane doesn’t understand Brazilian football culture. He does not understand the Brazilian team. So, he talks in an inelegant way because of what happened today.

We all know that this is not disrespectful to anyone. Celebrating the players is not disrespecting anyone. Which shows that there is a great union between the coach and the players. And a set of synergies that can catapult a team to great achievements.’

An article in Brazil highlighted some of Keane's lowest moments as a player, including this infamous career-ending tackle on Alf-Inge Haaland.

An article in Brazil highlighted some of Keane’s lowest moments as a player, including this infamous career-ending tackle on Alf-Inge Haaland.

History also called him the 'Palmeiras executioner' after his goal against the Brazilian club in Manchester United's 1999 Intercontinental Cup final victory

History also called him the ‘Palmeiras executioner’ after his goal against the Brazilian club in Manchester United’s 1999 Intercontinental Cup final victory

Luis Castro, who now manages Brazil's Serie A side Botafogo, says Keane simply doesn't understand the country's soccer culture.

Luis Castro, who now manages Brazil’s Serie A side Botafogo, says Keane simply doesn’t understand the country’s soccer culture.

However, the fiercest comments directed at Keane came on social media, where the Irishman was described as ‘irrelevant’ and a ‘butcher who never knew how to control a football’, among other insults.

One wrote on Twitter about his challenge to Haaland: ‘Fun fact: Roy Keane was the author of one of the most unfair moves in football. In revenge for a dispute, he gave this ticket to Alf-Inge Haaland, Haaland’s father, who had to finish his career. To this day he says he has no regrets.

Another said: ‘Do the Irish care what our former players think of their national team? Fuck Roy Keane’s opinion about celebrating Brazilians. He doesn’t interest anyone, he doesn’t have the slightest relevance, he doesn’t change anything. Fuck this. Sorry for the bad manners.

Orlando Calheiros, a podcast host with a PhD in social anthropology, also weighed in, saying: ‘You’re giving Roy Keane, one of the biggest pig’s feet in world football, too much of a leash. If he had been born in Brazil, he would have played a maximum of five, six seasons, at most, in the Brazilian first division, in Botafogo for life.

Rafael Belattini, one of Brazil’s NFL commentators, said: ‘Few things are more irrelevant than Roy Keane’s opinion of the Brazilian team. Do you translate Vampeta’s comments about the English team in England? Because Vampeta has a Cup, at least…’

1670333791 434 Brazil turn on evil executioner Roy Keane over criticism of

1670333798 175 Brazil turn on evil executioner Roy Keane over criticism of

Keane also received widespread criticism from Brazilians on Twitter after his criticism of the team.

Keane also received widespread criticism from Brazilians on Twitter after his criticism of the team.

Brazil boss Tite has also spoken out about the allegations of disrespect shown by his side in Qatar, calling such claims “evil.”

“You have to learn to go through the motions,” he said at his post-match press conference. And the movements are very tight!

Although I have to be very careful. There are evil people who will say that it was disrespectful.

Tite described as

Tite called the accusations of disrespect shown by his side against South Korea “evil”