‘Murderess’ socialite Rebecca Grossman WON’T testify in her own defense…as cop suggests daughter was wrong about seeing mom’s secret lover hiding in bushes, after crash that killed two young brothers

Rebecca Grossman will not testify in her own defense, she said Tuesday at her murder trial, where she is accused of running over and killing two young brothers while speeding in her white Mercedes.

When Judge Joseph Brandolino asked the wealthy socialite if she had discussed with her lawyers whether or not she should take the witness stand, she replied “yes.”

And when he asked her what her decision was, she told him in a barely audible whisper that she “would not testify.”

Grossman, 60, is charged with two counts of second-degree murder in the tragic deaths of eight-year-old Jacob and Mark Iskander, 11, at a marked pedestrian crossing in Westlake Village in September 2020.

She faces a maximum sentence of 34 years to life in prison if convicted, and also faces two additional counts of vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence, plus one count of vehicular manslaughter resulting in death.

Rebecca Grossman (right) leaves the court with her husband Peter Grossman

Rebecca leaves court with her husband Peter Grossman and their two children (center and right)

Rebecca leaves court with her husband Peter Grossman and their two children (center and right)

Erickson, pictured in 2018. Erickson was scheduled to race Grossman just before the crash

Erickson, pictured in 2018. Erickson was scheduled to race Grossman just before the crash

Grossman β€” who wore a black vest over a white shirt and black pants, with his hair tied back, in Van Nuys Court on Tuesday β€” has pleaded not guilty to all charges.

Her husband, plastic surgeon and burn specialist Dr. Peter Grossman, was in the courtroom β€” as he has been every day during the trial β€” with Rebecca, who has been free on $2 million bail since her arrest more than three years ago.

While prosecutors say it was Grossman, behind the wheel of her white Mercedes SUV, who killed the Iskander boys, her defense claims it was the black Mercedes SUV driven by her lover, ex-professional baseball player Scott Erickson, 56 – who she was reportedly racing with just before the crash – that was to blame.

Her attorneys also allege that Erickson β€” who has two black Mercedes SUVs, both with the same Nevada license plate β€” lied to police about the car he was driving the night of the crash.

And Grossman’s teenage daughter Alexis told the court Friday that she saw Erickson after the accident, hiding behind a tree while her mother spoke to police and later threatening to ruin her and her family if she told anyone she saw him. night.

Erickson was charged with reckless driving and his case was resolved in February 2022, with a judge ordering him to make a public service announcement to high school students about the importance of safe driving.

Grossman’s lead attorney, Tony Buzbee, rested his defense Tuesday and prosecutors called back several “rebuttal” witnesses to speak about testimonial conflicts raised by the defense.

John Grindy, ex-police officer and now accident reconstruction expert, disputed defense expert Dr. Justin Schorr that “you can’t do a full reconstruction of the accident without the black car,” referring to Erickson’s black Mercedes SUV that was directly in front of Grossman’s. car before the collision.

“I don’t agree with that,” said Grindy, who said having only Grossman’s white Mercedes, plus evidence and witness statements, were enough to “establish the speed and impact of the crash.”

Grindy criticized Dr. Schorr for not including conflicting eyewitness testimony in his conclusions, saying that “eyewitness testimony is important – it’s one piece of the puzzle.”

But when Buzbee showed a chart showing contradictions between eyewitness accounts of which car hit which boy, whether the black Mercedes or the white one was in front, and whether one or two bumps sounded during the crash, Grindy admitted that some witness accounts were ‘confusing’.

Rebecca Grossman will not testify in her own defense, she said Tuesday at her murder trial β€” where she is accused of running over and killing two young brothers while speeding in her white Mercedes

Rebecca Grossman will not testify in her own defense, she said Tuesday at her murder trial β€” where she is accused of running over and killing two young brothers while speeding in her white Mercedes

The wealthy socialite (pictured center) was accused of running over and killing two young brothers in Westlake Village in 2020

The wealthy socialite (pictured center) was accused of running over and killing two young brothers in Westlake Village in 2020

The attorney asked if he had tried to find and inspect Erickson’s black SUV or talk to Erickson himself, and Grindy replied, “No.”

Buzbee posed a similar question to Michael Hale, another accident reconstruction expert, asking, “Have you ever been asked to find Erickson’s car and see what the front end looked like?” the answer was again ‘No.’

Hale is the prosecutor who examined the black box of Grossman’s white Mercedes and previously told the jury of nine men and three women that she was traveling at 80 mph just before the crash and hit the brakes enough to slow down. to 120 km/h at the point of crash. impact with the boys.

On Tuesday, again on the witness stand, he stood by those numbers, adding that Grossman was “at full speed” two seconds before the tragedy.

A police officer at the scene of Grossman’s crash Tuesday doubted her daughter Alexis’ claim that she saw her lover Scott Erickson “hiding behind a tree” as she watched her mother talk to police about the crash spoke.

LA County prosecutor rebuttal witness Cody Gaudet told jurors he didn’t see Erickson β€” or anyone else β€” hiding, and if he had, “I would have noticed.”

“If someone were hiding behind a tree, it would immediately get my attention.”

Dept. Guadet added that no member of the public had called to say they had seen someone “hiding in the bushes or hiding in the trees.”

“If someone had done something suspicious like that, we would have investigated.”

Dept. Gaudet also said he did not see any damaged black SUV in the area.

And when asked if anyone else had reported seeing Erickson’s black SUV or “a black SUV with a damaged front end” near the crash scene, Dep. Gaudet replied, “Not as far as I know.”

Grossman, previously pictured in Van Nuys Court, pleaded not guilty to all charges

Grossman, previously pictured in Van Nuys Court, pleaded not guilty to all charges

Rebecca Grossman's tearful teenage daughter, Alexis seen far right, told the wealthy socialist's murder trial on Friday how she saw her mother's lover, Scott Erickson, hiding behind a tree.

Rebecca Grossman’s tearful teenage daughter, Alexis seen far right, told the wealthy socialist’s murder trial on Friday how she saw her mother’s lover, Scott Erickson, hiding behind a tree.

Erickson played for a year with the Los Angeles Dodgers from 2005, after which he ended his career with the New York Yankees in 2006

Erickson played for a year with the Los Angeles Dodgers from 2005, after which he ended his career with the New York Yankees in 2006

Grossman, 60, is charged with two counts of second-degree murder in the tragic deaths of Jacob, 8, and Mark Iskander, 11, at a marked crosswalk in September 2020

Grossman, 60, is charged with two counts of second-degree murder in the tragic deaths of Jacob, 8, and Mark Iskander, 11, at a marked crosswalk in September 2020

Grossman's white Mercedes SUV is pictured shortly after the crash

Grossman’s white Mercedes SUV is pictured shortly after the crash

When Buzbee asked him if he had “made any attempt to find Scott Erickson…” or search his car to see if it was damaged in the front?’ Gaudet replied: ‘No.’

Alexis Grossman – who was 16 at the time of the tragedy – told the court on Friday that she was driving to pick up a pizza when she saw police lights flashing and her mother, near her white Mercedes SUV, passing through the police were questioned.

β€œI stopped and ran to her screaming, ‘Mommy, Mommy. But the police told me I couldn’t talk to my mother and told me to go home.’

Alexis, now 19 and a sophomore at Clemson University, said she went back to her car and that’s when she turned around and “I saw Scott Erickson.” He was sitting behind a tree in the bushes and stuck his head out and we made eye contact.”

She told lead attorney Tony Buzbee that she did not see Erickson’s black Mercedes SUV and did not speak to him because, “I was so surprised to see my mother surrounded by police.” I panicked and had a panic attack.’

She drove the short distance back to her mother’s house in Westlake Village, where, shortly after she got there, “the front door burst open and Scott Erickson walked in and said, ‘Why did your mother stop?’ Why did your mother quit?”

‘He seemed very angry. He was furious. I smelled alcohol on him. He panicked. I was scared.

‘He shouted, ‘Don’t say anything. Don’t tell anyone you saw me or I will ruin you and your family.’

‘He’s a big guy. He’s a baseball player and he was scary,” added Erickson’s Alexis, a 6-foot-4, 240-pound former professional pitcher.

“I was afraid he would do something to hurt me or my family because of what he said.”

Under cross-examination, Alexis told the court Friday that she did not tell police or anyone else β€” except her parents and her family’s attorney, who later died β€” that she had seen Erickson that night until Buzbee led the defense in the took over the case just before the trial started. in January this year.