It’s what you think it is! TV reporter desperate to protect her mic covers it in a condom

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It IS what you think it is! TV reporter desperate to protect her microphone from Hurricane Ian covers it with a condom

  • Viewers saw an unusual microphone appendix to aligning with NBC coverage
  • Kyla Galer told viewers she put on the condom to protect it from the rain
  • “You definitely round off a weather segment that way,” said one social media user
  • She was reporting in the Naples area, where Hurricane Ian has hit thousands

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We’ve all gone out of our way to keep our belongings dry, but one reporter took it one step further during her coverage of Hurricane Ian.

Viewers saw an unusual microphone confirmation when tuning in to NBC’s coverage of the Florida Category 4 storm on Wednesday.

NBC’s Kyla Galer explained to viewers that she put a condom on the microphone to protect it from the rain.

β€œA lot of people ask what’s on my microphone. It is what you think it is – it’s a condom!’ explained Galer.

β€œIt helps protect the equipment, we can’t get these microphones wet. There is a lot of wind, there is a lot of rain, so we have to do what we have to do, which is put a condom on the microphone.’

She was reporting in the Naples area, Florida, where the Category 4 storm left thousands without power.

Galer went on to use the microphone in her coverage, allowing her to follow NBC’s viewers live while protecting her equipment.

“That’s sure to round out a weather segment,” one social media user said on Twitter.

In order not to get her mic wet, NBC's Kyla Galer went out of her way to protect her gear

In order not to get her mic wet, NBC’s Kyla Galer went out of her way to protect her gear

She explained to viewers that she put a condom on the microphone on Wednesday to protect him from the rain

She explained to viewers that she put a condom on the microphone on Wednesday to protect him from the rain

She explained to viewers that she put a condom on the microphone on Wednesday to protect him from the rain

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1664457266 189 Its what you think it is TV reporter desperate to

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1664457266 314 Its what you think it is TV reporter desperate to

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1664457266 657 Its what you think it is TV reporter desperate to

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1664457266 8 Its what you think it is TV reporter desperate to

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Weather reporters assaulted all over Florida

Weather Channel’s Jim Cantore was taped recoiling from a thunderclap, dodging what could have been a close call as Hurricane Ian ravaged reporters across Florida.

Cantore jumped away from the sound during the live broadcast, although it’s not clear how close he was to where the lightning struck.

The reporter then paced away from the direction of the lightning while shaking his head, leaving the live recording while another reporter took over.

“It’s gotten pretty rough in here,” she said, and seemed to be struggling too.

Meanwhile, lead meteorologist at GMA News Ginger Zee was also recorded as struggling to maintain her feat amid howling winds reaching 150 mph at their peak.

Social media users took to Twitter to ask why weather reporters were potentially endangered, with images of multiple correspondents struggling in the Category 4 storm.

“My colleague at Waterman Broadcasting answered a lot of questions, haha,” says ABC7’s Jeff Butera, who adds that they do “safe hurricane reporting.”

“The weather is hitting you hard!” said a second social media user.

“If it works, it works,” added a third.

Reporters have been beaten back and forth across the state as news outlets send their experienced storm chasers to cover the hurricane.

A CBS weather forecaster was posted in Florida’s largest city, Miami, and stood outside the state’s signature palm trees as the rain poured down on her and the news crew.

A Fox News weather forecaster came to the state and tracked the storm in Charlotte County donning thick glasses and a long raincoat as he challenged the hurricane.

Other correspondents wear helmets to protect them from flying debris.

The Pentagon said 3,200 National Guardsmen had been called up in Florida, and another 1,800 later.

Authorities in several municipalities, including Miami, Fort Lauderdale and Tampa, distributed free sandbags to help residents protect their homes from flooding.

Terrified residents have also desperately dug huge ditches to divert floodwater from their homes, while others have cleared supermarket shelves of water and supplies.

Schools in 26 Florida counties have announced they will be closed as more than a million homes along Florida’s west coast are at risk of storm surge damage from Hurricane Ian.

Weather Channel's Jim Cantore recovers quickly and tries to walk slowly to a street sign where he anchors himself after a branch hit him

Weather Channel's Jim Cantore recovers quickly and tries to walk slowly to a street sign where he anchors himself after a branch hit him

Weather Channel’s Jim Cantore recovers quickly and tries to walk slowly to a street sign where he anchors himself after a branch hit him

Cantore is shown recoiling from a thunderclap, dodging what could have been a close call as Hurricane Ian hits reporters statewide

Cantore is shown recoiling from a thunderclap, dodging what could have been a close call as Hurricane Ian hits reporters statewide

Cantore is shown recoiling from a thunderclap, dodging what could have been a close call as Hurricane Ian hits reporters statewide

A weather forecaster for CNN is on the water in St. Petersburg, Florida, just hours before Hurricane Ian started producing large, unpredictable waves

A weather forecaster for CNN is on the water in St. Petersburg, Florida, just hours before Hurricane Ian started producing large, unpredictable waves

A weather forecaster for CNN is on the water in St. Petersburg, Florida, just hours before Hurricane Ian started producing large, unpredictable waves

Space station captures massive Hurricane Ian hitting Florida

Space station captures massive Hurricane Ian hitting Florida

Space station captures massive Hurricane Ian hitting Florida

A still photo shows the damage done by the hurricane

A still photo shows the damage done by the hurricane

A still photo shows the damage done by the hurricane