Fat activist Virginia Sole-Smith reveals how she feeds her kids dessert first after divorcing fitness freak husband who lost it when their daughter eat a stick of butter

Virginia Sole-Smith, a fat activist, has sparked controversy by saying that childhood obesity is not a problem, but anti-fat bias is, and that she lets her children eat whatever they want.

She is the author of “Fat Talk: Parenting in the Age of Diet Culture” and an advocate for dismantling diet culture and combating fat bias.

β€œWe don’t take body size into account,” Sole-Smith said on the Pressure Cooker podcast. ‘How your child eats and how much he exercises is actually the smallest piece of the puzzle. If you focus on that with the goal of controlling your child’s weight, you’re doing a lot of damage.”

Although Sole-Smith’s book is a New York Times bestseller and many turn to her for parenting advice, others think she promotes a dangerous lifestyle.

“It’s not okay to be overweight, it’s not okay to eat excess sugar and animal fats, it’s not okay to eat junk food, it’s not okay to not move your body, it’s not okay to claiming that being overweight is all good,” Caroline Hailstone said on one of Sole-Smith’s Instagram posts.

Virginia Sole-Smith (pictured), author of ‘Fat Talk: Parenting in the Age of Diet Culture’, says childhood obesity is not a problem, but anti-fat bias is.

Sole-Smith said she and her ex-husband, Dan Upham (right), had an argument when their daughter ate a whole stick of butter and that she didn't want to stop her daughter from eating it

Sole-Smith said she and her ex-husband, Dan Upham (right), had an argument when their daughter ate a whole stick of butter and that she didn’t want to stop her daughter from eating it

‘Being a healthy weight is fine, having a good low body fat is healthy, but promoting unhealthy eating, as you are doing, will only increase diabetes, hospital visits and mortality.’

Sole Smith told The New York Times in her home they don’t label food as good or bad, healthy or unhealthy, and she serves desserts and snacks for her two children at dinner.

She said if parents place restrictions on food, their children won’t be able to figure out how to feed themselves based on what their bodies need.

Speaking to the Times, the mother of two served her daughters broccoli, chicken and brownies for dinner. After eating a few snacks, the girls are allowed to play in the garden and read books at the dining table.

Sole-Smith started her career in women’s magazines in the early 2000s and said she was running half marathons at that point in her life.

‘They were the ‘can you have it all’ years. You go for the big job. You go for the perfect body. You go for the great marriage. You go for motherhood. You go for the perfect house,” she said.

Sole-Smith also said she is against doctors prescribing weight loss and a solution to health problems and that they should treat patients as they are.

‘It doesn’t matter what people’s health status is. Right? Drug addicts deserve dignity and respect in medical care. Like, it doesn’t matter if you caused it, doctors are supposed to meet you where you are,” Sole-Smith said.

β€œHealth is a resource and a privilege that so many people do not have access to. Is it healthy for me to eat this broccoli for dinner? Or is it health that I was able to connect with my daughter for a few minutes today?’

Data shows obesity rates among young people quadrupled globally between 1990 and 2022 – the latest year available – while rates among adults more than doubled, researchers found.

1713745787 536 Fat activist Virginia Sole Smith reveals how she feeds her kids

1713745793 661 Fat activist Virginia Sole Smith reveals how she feeds her kids

This means obesity is now the most common form of malnutrition in many countries, according to the study published in the medical journal Lancet.

The obesity rate among American adults has increased from 21.2 percent in 1990 to 43.8 percent in 2022 for women and from 16.9 percent to 41.6 percent for men.

During the same period, the rate among American girls nearly doubled from 11.6 percent to 19.4 percent and among boys from 11.5 percent to 21.7 percent.

According to the CDC, heart disease, diabetes and liver disease are among the ten leading causes of death in the United States.

β€œI think it’s possible to simultaneously keep in mind that the state of obesity is concerning, and at the same time protect the rights of the people who suffer from it,” said Kelly Brownell, professor emeritus of public policy at Duke University.

‘You can think of many other parallels, like depression or alcoholism, where you don’t want the people who have these things to be stigmatized – there are clearly negative effects associated with that – but that doesn’t mean you discount the ravages of it. diseases.’

Sole-Smith’s controversial stance on what should be considered a healthy diet has sparked a debate that she has even experienced in her own marriage.

She told The New York Times that she and her ex-husband, Dan Upham, had an argument when their daughter ate a whole stick of butter.

The obesity rate among American adults has increased from 21.2 percent in 1990 to 43.8 percent in 2022 for women and 16.9 percent to 41.6 percent for men

The obesity rate among American adults has increased from 21.2 percent in 1990 to 43.8 percent in 2022 for women and 16.9 percent to 41.6 percent for men

Between 1990 and 2022, the rate nearly doubled among American girls from 11.6 percent to 19.4 percent and among boys from 11.5 percent to 21.7 percent

Between 1990 and 2022, the rate nearly doubled among American girls from 11.6 percent to 19.4 percent and among boys from 11.5 percent to 21.7 percent

Sole-Smith, her daughter, ate the stick because she thought it was cheese and Upham wanted to intervene and stop her from eating it.

β€œIf I put butter on the table and a child wants to eat the butter, that’s fine with me,” Sole-Smith said.

The couple announced their divorce in the summer of 2023 after 14 years of marriage and almost 25 years together.

“We would all do much better to fear less about divorce, just as we would all do much better to fear less about getting fat,” she said.

Sole-Smith faced backlash for one Op-ed from the New York Times on the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines for the treatment of children with obesity.

“We can’t solve anti-fat bias by making fat kids thin,” she said.

Dr. Barry Reiner, a pediatric endocrinologist in Baltimore, criticized Sole-Smith for failing to recognize that weight can have an impact on children’s health.

“Additional complications of childhood obesity include ovarian dysfunction, liver and cardiovascular damage, debilitating orthopedic conditions and sleep apnea,” Reiner said in an article. letter to the editor.

“Any time we can change a child’s trajectory of unhealthy weight gain, we significantly improve that child’s chances of normal longevity and quality of life.”